Early Basques

It isn’t very helpful to look to some of the modern descriptions of the Basque people. These modern description begin by describing the range of modern Basque people as they have been defined in the era beginning from Grandmother Ann’s death, late nineteenth century Europe. Ann was born in the first decade of that century. So let’s start with a clean page and note Basque history as it relates to the American continent.

From America B. C.: Ancient Settlers in the New World by Barry Fell:

pg 3. “Two centuries of independence, two hundred years of national awareness, these are the underlying themes of countless festivities now in progress or planned throughout fifty American states. The world at large pauses a moment to reflect upon the prodigy that grew from the thirteen rebellious colonies when George III lost his American domains.

somehow a very large slice of America’s past has mysteriously vanished from our public records.

But wait a bit. There is more to America’s past than appears upon the surface. A strange unrest is apparent among many of the younger historians and archaeologists of the colleges and universities, a sense that somehow a very large slice of America’s past has mysteriously vanished from our public records. For how else can we explain the ever-swelling tally of puzzling ancient inscriptions now being reported from nearly all parts of the United States, Canada, and Latin America?

the colonists intermarried with the Amerindians, and so their descendants still live here today.

The inscriptions are written in various European and Mediterranean languages in alphabets that date from 2,500 years ago, and they speak not only of visits by ancient ships, but also of permanent colonies of Celts, Basques, Libyans, and even Egyptians. They occur in buried temples, on tablets and on gravestones and on cliff faces. From some of them we infer that the colonists intermarried with the Amerindians, and so their descendants still live here today.

Whether Grandmother Ann or her ancestor mothers intermarried with Amerindians, we do not know. But certainly she has many descendants still living here today. We as a family have always had a tradition that we had Indian blood in our history. Ann is the first possible part Indian I have found in our ancestral tree.

 

 

Exploring History through Ancestry and Literature